University of Cincinnati - College of Law

University of Cincinnati - College of Law

About

Established in 1833, the University of Cincinnati College of Law is the 4th oldest continuously operating law school in the country. Timothy Walker, along with Edward King and Judge John C. Wright of the Ohio Supreme Court, established the Cincinnati Law School, a small law school with 17 students, above a downtown office in a city that was then a frontier outpost. The Cincinnati Law School became a department of the Cincinnati College in 1835, which gave it the authority to confer degrees. Until 1885, Cincinnati was the only law school in Ohio.

 

UC Law students benefit from a connection to one of the nation’s top public research universities. In addition to its reputation for academic and research excellence, the University of Cincinnati was named one of the “World’s Most Beautiful College Campuses” by Forbes magazine. For first-time visitors and architecture enthusiasts, it is a must-see in Cincinnati.

 

With unlimited access to university events and facilities, Cincinnati Law students are active members of the UC community. On weekends, they can be found cheering on the Bearcats, and on weekdays they are often having a post-lecture workout at the Campus Recreation Center, named one of the “25 Most Amazing Campus Student Recreation Centers.”

 

The College’s most famous alumnus, William Howard Taft, is the only person in history to be both President and Chief Justice of the United States.

 

LL.M Admission

The University of Cincinnati College of Law is pleased to offer a program of study on the US legal system to practicing attorneys and law school graduates who received their legal education outside the United States. The L.L.M. program is a 9-month program which is designed to introduce internationally trained lawyers to the U.S. legal system while also giving each student an opportunity to design a course of study that best advances his or her professional agenda. Students who complete the program are better able to represent U.S. clients and more prepared for negotiations and litigation with U.S. parties. For more information about the UC Law LL.M. program, visit the L.L.M. site. You are strongly encouraged to submit all application materials by May 15th. (This new date is an extension.)

 

The documents listed below must be sent to us in order for your application to be considered.

 

(1) Personal Statement. Please describe why you wish to study law in the U.S and how you plan to use the knowledge, skills, and degree earned in this program. Your essay should be one to two pages long. 

 

(2) Resume or Curriculum Vitae. Please provide a resume listing and describing your professional, educational or other related experience. Include the name of each employer, the position you held, and the dates you were employed.

 

(3) 2 Recommendations. Please ask two individuals who are familiar with your academic or legal work to supply a letter telling us why you would be a good candidate for the LL.M.program. The writers may submit their letters via email (preferred) or regular mail. You will provide the name of each writer, his or her employer, and his or her email address on this application and we will expect a letter of recommendation to come from the email address provided. The email address should be affiliated with a university, law firm or other employer. If email is not available, the writer should put the completed form in an envelope, seal the envelope, and sign his or her name on top of the seal. You should submit the unopened envelope to us via postal mail. If this is not possible, the writer of the recommendation should return it to us directly.

 

(4) Credential Evaluation. We must receive a course by course evaluation of your previous higher education before we can consider your application. You may choose from the following organizations to provide your evaluation: ECE (www.ece.org) or WES (www.wes.org). If you choose WES, please note the following. You will find all the information you need at www.wes.org. Please go to that website to apply for your evaluation. Be sure to choose (1) a course-by-course evaluation and (2) University of Cincinnati College of Law as a recipient of your evaluation. All transcripts from non-US post-secondary educational institutions must be sent directly to WES by the issuing institution. If your transcripts and diplomas are in languages other than English you must supply translations. It is critical that you read and follow the WES “Required Documents” information specific to your country of study to ensure that your evaluation is completed as quickly as possible. Once all the required documentation is received by WES, the evaluation will be completed in 7 business days and will be sent directly to UC College of Law. You will receive a personal copy as well.

 

(5) TOEFL or IELTS Score. If your native language is not English you must supply evidence of your English proficiency. Our TOEFL institutional code is 1833. Preference will be given to applicants with a 100 internet-based TOEFL score or equivalent. Applicants with TOEFL scores of 80 and above will also be considered.

 

Conditional admission is available for otherwise qualified students who need additional English language instruction. English training is available on the UC campus at ELS-Cincinnati Language Center.

 

We encourage you to submit the on-line version of the application form via the internet. If this is not possible you may print the form and return it by mail. Please type or print your answers.

 

Documents being submitted by mail should be sent to the following address:

 

Nora Burke Wagner
University of Cincinnati
College of Law
LL.M.PROGRAM
PO Box 210040
Clifton Ave & Calhoun Street
Cincinnati, OH 45221-0040
USA

Acceptance Deposit:

Upon receiving notice of acceptance, the applicant is required to make an acceptance deposit of $250 by the date listed in the letter of acceptance. Payment of the deposit when due assures the applicant of a place in the class and is considered as evidence of good faith that he or she will register. If the student notifies the College of Law by May 15 in writing that he/she does not plan to enroll at the University of Cincinnati College of Law, $125 of the $250 acceptance deposit will be refunded.

Bar Admissions:

Completion of the UC Law LL.M.program does NOT guarantee your eligibility to practice law in the U.S.

Applicants who intend to practice law in the U.S. should be aware that each state sets its own requirements for eligibility, and admission to the bar in all states involves character, fitness and other qualifications. Some states have specific educational and documentation requirements that must be met by applicants who completed some of their post-secondary education outside of the U.S. Applicants are strongly encouraged to research all of the bar exam eligibility requirements in the state(s) in which they intend to practice by consulting the state bar authority.

Dean's Corner

The University of Cincinnati distinguishes itself from other law schools in a number of ways. Not only are we the fourth oldest continuing operating law school in the country, but we are also the most up to date in its program of instruction to prepare students for the practice of law. The city itself is currently undergoing a business and arts renaissance, including a rejuvenation of the downtown and Over the Rhine areas. This has created the opportunity for the College of Law to serve as a central point, connecting the local community with scholars, attorneys, and businesspeople all over the world.

 

Cincinnati is also recognized as one of the nation’s top destinations for start-up companies. Our students are able to be a part of this ecosystem through the Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic (ECDC), and help bring businesses to life at places like The Brandery, one of the nation’s Top 10 accelerators. It’s never been a better time to be a Bearcat.

 

Our Mission

The mission of the University of Cincinnati College of Law is to educate and inspire leaders who pursue justice and advance the role of law in society.

 

Our Vision

We are a community of learners, led by a faculty committed to excellent teaching, scholarship, and service. We strive to create a learning environment that inspires the pursuit of justice, cultivates diverse and innovative ideas about law in society, fosters collaborative relationships, and imparts the knowledge, values, and competencies needed to excel in a changing world.

Board of Visitors

The University of Cincinnati College of Law Board of Visitors was established to provide advocacy, advice, and counsel to the Dean with respect to the College’s institutional advancement.

 

The responsibilities of the UC Law Board of Visitors include:

 

  • Advising the Dean and faculty of the evolving needs of the legal profession
  • Providing counsel to the Dean, administration, and faculty on curriculum, admissions, career opportunities for students, and resources
  • Providing expert advice to the Dean on planning, policy, and development
  • Encouraging financial support for the College of Law
  • Advocating for College of Law students and faculty among members of the legal profession and the general community

 

The Board of Visitors meets as a full board two times per year, generally once in the Fall Semester and once in the Spring Semester.

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LL.M Program

The University of Cincinnati College of Law is pleased to offer a program of study on the US legal system to practicing attorneys and law school graduates who received their legal education outside the United States.

 

The LLM program is designed to introduce internationally trained lawyers to the US legal system while also giving each student an opportunity to design a course of study at UC Law that best advances his or her professional agenda. Students who complete the program are better able to represent U.S. clients and more prepared for negotiations and litigation with U.S. parties.

 

The LLM program can be completed in as little as 9 months, although some students decide to spend up to two academic years in the program.

 

Students in the LLM program complete at least twenty-four credits hours in order to earn the LLM degree. This generally occurs within one academic year. Three courses are designed specifically for LLM students and are required to complete the program:

 

Introduction to Law. All students in the program earn one credit hour by participating in this intensive course, which occurs immediately preceding the start of regular semester course work. This course provides a high-level introduction to the structure of the U.S. government, foundational legal concepts, and the case law and statutory components of the U.S. legal system. The course also familiarizes students with how to prepare for and participate most fully in courses at the College of Law.

 

The U.S. Legal System. This three-credit course expands upon the foundation laid in Introduction to Law. Students gain a more advanced understanding of the critical features of the U.S. legal tradition, the functional components and participants in our legal system, and key legal concepts including legal ethics and professional responsibility.

 

Legal Research & Writing for LLM Students. This three-credit course is similar to our traditional legal research & writing course, designed, however, to meet the needs of non-native English speakers. It is designed to help students develop the written communication skills, research skills, and persuasion strategies needed in both law school and professional practice as a lawyer.

 

Additional courses are selected by individual students working in consultation with the Associate Dean and faculty. By choosing courses from among the range of those offered to all law students, LLM students are able to design a course of study that best advances their own professional agendas.

 

Students may select courses in areas of study, called professional pathways, such as Business and Entrepreneurship; Criminal; International; Innovation, Technology and Intellectual Property; Science, Health, and Environment; Public Interest; Litigation and Alternative Dispute Resolution; General and Small Practice.

 

Information about courses we offer is located here. You may browse the list of courses offered this semester and last semester and locate lists from previous semesters under “Archived Material.” Please note, however, that the list changes every year so that some courses may not be offered during your year of study at the College of Law.

 

Classroom instruction is integrated with practice observations at courtrooms, government agencies, law firms, and corporate offices. During these observations, participants interact with judges, attorneys, general counsel, and business executives, who convey critical insights about practice in the U.S., including:

 

  • U.S. business customs
  • Liaising effectively with counsel
  • Navigating the U.S. judicial system

 

The College of Law will also provide forums for participants to discuss their legal cultures, as well as to introduce their law firms or institutions to area attorneys and business executives. In this way, participants and local attorneys and executives have many opportunities to network and form lasting professional contacts.

 

Taking a Bar Exam

Students wishing to seek admission to practice law in Ohio are required to successfully complete 30 credit hours. Twenty credit hours must be taken from the following list of courses identified by the Ohio Supreme Court: Legal Research/Writing; Business Associations; Conflict of Laws; Constitutional Law; Contracts; Criminal Law/Criminal Procedure; Wills, Trusts and Estates; Evidence; Family Law; Civil Procedure; Federal Income Taxes; Professional Responsibility/Legal Ethics; Property (Real & Personal); Torts; Uniform Commercial Code (Articles II, III, & IX). Please contact the Ohio Supreme Court for additional information and to determine whether your previous education in combination with the LL.M. program will be sufficient to apply to take the bar exam.

 

Completion of the LLM program does NOT guarantee your eligibility to practice law in the U.S.

 

Completion of the LL.M. program does not guarantee that you will be able to take a bar exam and practice law in the U.S. Each state sets its own requirements for eligibility, and admission to the bar in all states involves character, fitness and other qualifications. Some states have specific educational and documentation requirements that must be met by individuals who completed post-secondary education outside of the U.S. Applicants are strongly encouraged to determine what all of these requirements are in the state(s) in which they intend to practice by consulting the state bar authority directly and/or the website of the National Council of Bar Examiners at www.ncbex.org.

 

Scholarships Available

Upon submitting your application to the LLM degree program, please write to us viauclawllm@uc.edu to express your interest in a scholarship.

Competitions

Moot Court Program

Moot Court is the student-run appellate advocacy honors society of the University of Cincinnati College of Law. To join the Moot Court Board, students must compete in the LexisNexis Moot Court Competition during the fall semester of their 2L year. During the Anderson Competition, students research and prepare an appellate brief, and argue their position before members of the local legal community who act as appellate court judges. A passing grade on the brief and oral advocacy competition gives students one non-classroom credit hour and fulfills their writing requirement. The top performers receive an invitation to join the Moot Court Board for the remainder of their law school career.

 

As members of the UC Law Moot Court Board, students are eligible for two non-classroom credit hours for each of their remaining semesters. To receive credit, students must: participate in competitions hosted by other law schools; host the August A. Rendigs, Jr. National Product Liability Moot Court Competition; and hold the intramural competition during their 3L year.

 

Alternative Dispute Resolution

Lawyering necessarily involves anticipating, avoiding, or resolving a client's legal problems. Often, legal problems have given rise to disputes. These may be resolved by a court or administrative agency through formal legal process. Often, however, lawyers assist clients to resolve disputes through less formal alternatives such as negotiation, mediation or arbitration various forms of "Alternative Dispute Resolution."

 

UC Law students preparing to represent clients in negotiation, mediation or arbitration are advised to take the courses we offer: Negotiation, Mediation-in-Neutral, Mediation Advocacy, Advanced Decision Analysis and Arbitration. Students are also encouraged to participate in the ABA-sponsored Negotiation and Representation-in-Mediation competitions, conducted through UC Law's Center for Practice and the ADR Club, and to pursue internship, externship, and independent project opportunities under the guidance of our dispute resolution faculty.

 

Trial Practice

The University of Cincinnati College of Law offers a general trial practice course every semester, taught by trial attorneys with extensive experience in the courtroom and the classroom. Our spring semester trial practice course is taught by Attorneys Charles G. Atkins and Thomas L. Stachler and provides hands-on preparation for the courtroom.

 

The fall semester trial practice competition course similarly prepares students for the courtroom, but with an eye toward trial practice team readiness for inter-school competitions. The course is taught by Honorable Carl Stich, Jr., recently appointed to the Hamilton County Court of Common Pleas, Joseph Heyd, Head of Global Litigation at The Procter & Gamble Company, andNicholas Bunch, partner at White, Getgey & Meyer Co., L.P.A . In many years, the UC College of Law offers a trial practice course focused on the criminal defense. UC Law also offers related and advanced courses for trial work, including witness preparation and pre-trial discovery.

 

Legal Writing Competitions

Many organizations throughout the country, and the world, sponsor writing competitions for law students.  The competitions typically focus on a particular area of the law.  Participating in a writing competition is a great way to explore an area of interest and to hone your writing skills.  As a bonus, the competitions often grant cash prizes, travel opportunities, or publication opportunities for the winning essays.  For more information feel free to contact Professor Rachel Smith (rachel.smith@uc.edu) or go directly to our database of competitions.

 

Rendigs Competition

2016 August A. Rendigs, Jr. National Products Liability Moot Court Competition

 

On behalf of the law firm of Rendigs, Fry, Kiely & Dennis, LLP and the University of Cincinnati College of Law, the University of Cincinnati Moot Court Honor Board cordially invites your school to compete in the 29th Annual August A. Rendigs, Jr. National Products Liability Moot Court Competition to be held March 11-12, 2016 in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Journals

Writing is at the heart of the legal profession. Cincinnati Law’s prestigious law journals enable students to publish and edit the work of important national and international legal scholars.

 

Established in 1927, the University of Cincinnati Law Review is one of the oldest and most respected legal journals in the country. Each volume is edited by 30 law students chosen each year on the basis of their grade point averages and writing ability. Second-year members write case notes on the impact of recent court decisions. Third-year students write in-depth editorial notes and oversee the UCLaw Review Blog.

 

The Human Rights Quarterly is recognized as the leading academic journal in the human rights field. With a worldwide audience, the Quarterly covers the range of matters encompassed by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It is edited by fellows of UC Law's Urban Morgan Institute.

 

The Immigration and Nationality Law Review is one of only two major student-edited American law journals focusing on the increasingly important field of immigration law. Second and third year law school students are responsible for coordinating the production of the journal.

 

The Freedom Center Journal is published jointly with the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. Edited and published annually by law students, the FCJ covers a diverse range of issues related to race, gender, sexuality, class, freedom, justice and law.

 

The Intellectual Property and Computer Law Journal is the newest journal addition and the first journal to be published completely online. It covers subject matter related to intellectual property (including patent, copyright, trademark, and trade secrecy issues), as well as scholarship on entertainment, media and free expression, telecommunications, privacy, sports law, and computer and technology subjects.

Externships

Cincinnati Law’s unique location in a major metropolitan area provides students with unparalleled externship opportunities. Externships allow law students to earn academic credit while gaining valuable supervised experience at a host of companies, law firms, non-profit organizations, and judicial chambers.

 

Legal Extern Program

The University of Cincinnati legal extern program enables our students to gain important practical skills, make valuable connections in the legal community, and develop their professional identity under the direct supervision of an experienced attorney. Second and third year law students may apply to work for academic credit at a variety of placement sites, including government agencies, non-profit organizations, and Fortune 500 corporations.

 

Each student is assigned an Attorney Field Supervisor at the placement site who supervises the student’s work and provides professional guidance and mentoring. UC Law students must complete a minimum of 100 hours at their placement site and enroll in the mandatory companion course.

 

Third year students are eligible to obtain a Limited License to Practice as a Legal Intern from the Ohio or Kentucky Supreme Courts. Externs with a limited license are able to make court appearances on behalf of their clients under the direct supervision of a licensed attorney.

 

Students can choose from a variety of placement sites. Recent University of Cincinnati Legal Externs have been placed at The Kroger Company, Macy’s, Legal Aid of Greater Cincinnati, The Kentucky Department of Public Advocacy, Office of the Cincinnati City Solicitor, Ohio Justice and Policy Center, Office of the United States Attorney for the Southern District of Ohio, Fifth Third Bank, ProSeniors, National Labor Relations Board, Housing Opportunities Made Equal, Cincinnati Public School, Su Casa Hispanic Center, United States Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Cincinnati Interfaith Workers’ Center, Center for Closing the Health Gap, Children’s Law Center, University of Cincinnati Department of Athletic Compliance, Internal Revenue Service, Procter and Gamble, Talbert House Fatherhood Project, and various county prosecutors and public defenders’ offices among many, many others.

 

Anyone with questions about the University of Cincinnati Legal Extern Program should contact the Director of Legal Externships and Public Service, Karla Markley Hall, at karla.hall@uc.edu or 513-556-0900.

Judical Extern Program

The judicial extern program allows law students to perform essentially the same work as that performed by a law clerk to a judge. It usually involves preparing memoranda on cases, reviewing case files, drafting opinions and orders, and attending trials, hearings, and conferences. The precise tasks depend upon the type of court and style of the judge. Judicial externs also have an inside view of the judicial process, learning not only how the courts function, but also what influences a judge to rule in a particular way.

 

Few law school experiences provide so many benefits related to the professional development of a prospective lawyer. For those students interested in a judicial clerkship, the program gives a taste of the work to help them decide whether to pursue a clerkship, as well as the most relevant training. A judicial externship also is a strong addition to a resume.

 

In assigning placements, a student’s interests and capabilities are matched with the needs of the judges. Opportunities are available in both state and federal courts. Students must complete a minimum of 100 hours at their placement site at a rate not to exceed ten hours per week. UC Law students must also enroll in the mandatory companion course. Academic credit is awarded for both classroom and placement components.

 

For more information about the UC Law judicial extern program, contact Professor Marianna Bettman atmarianna.bettman@uc.edu or 513-556-0958.

Transfer/Visiting Students

Admission

The deadline for the Fall 2018 Transfer/Visiting Application is August 10, 2017. There is no fee to apply.

 

Admission will be based primarily upon the applicant's law school academic record and to a lesser degree the applicant's pre-law qualifications. Only applicants transferring from a law school that is a full member of the American Bar Association (ABA) will be considered for admission. Since the UC College of Law enrolls a small entering class, the space available varies from year to year. No applicant will be admitted who is not in good standing with a law school previously attended.

 

In order to be considered for admission to the University of Cincinnati College of Law, transfer and visiting students must:

 

1. Complete at least one year of study at another law school that is a member of the American Bar Association (ABA). The UC College of Law does not consider applicants from fee-paid non-member schools.

2. Complete the 2017 Transfer/Visiting Student application online.

3. Submit all of the following:

 

  • Credential Assembly Report (applicants must have their report submitted along with their e-app from LSAC)
  • Personal statement explaining the applicant's interest in transferring to the University of Cincinnati College of Law
  • Recommendations from two law school professors and a letter of good standing from the previous law school (these items may be submitted through the LSAC CAS service or sent directly to the UC College of Law Office of Admissions).

Transfer of Credit

Law school work will be evaluated and credited toward the Juris Doctor requirements as determined by the Associate Dean. However, as a general rule, the transfer of credit for first year classes can be completed with a grade of at least a "C". On occasion students may need to complete a UC College of Law first year course that was not completed at the previous law school. Our first year and upper level curriculum can be reviewed under the College of Law's Academics section. Transfer students may be granted academic credit up to the equivalent of three semesters for full-time students or up to four semesters for part-time students, for work successfully completed at another AALS member school and two semesters for full-time students or 2.6 semesters for part-time students for work successfully completed at a non-AALS member law school. The right is reserved not to grant credit for work done in another law school.

Other Information

Transfer students are eligible to write for law review as junior members for their third year in the UC College of Law. Transfer students also are eligible for the intramural Moot Court competition that takes place each fall semester.

Visiting Students

A student enrolled in another accredited law school who has a compelling need to take up to one year of courses at the College of Law may apply for admission as a transient, or visiting, student. The student should submit the transfer/visiting application and a letter requesting transient status. The student must also provide a letter from the dean of the primary law school stating that credits earned at the University of Cincinnati College of Law will be applied to the student's degree requirements. The letter should also specify other requirements of the primary law school. In addition, the visiting student must submit all of the transfer requirements listed above.

Certificate Programs

Graduate certificate programs are designed for students who would like to learn more about the law, but do not want to earn a J.D. or LL.M. degree. Requirements and the application process for each of the UC Law certificate programs are described below.

Certificate in Legal Studies

Successful applicants who are UC graduate students must be in good standing with the University of Cincinnati and have a target grade point average of a 3.0. Additional factors to be considered include the applicant’s other professional experience, prior education, and extracurricular activities. Graduate students will be expected to secure and communicate approval of their Program Director in order to enroll in the certificate and may be asked to provide transcripts, a letter of recommendation, a statement of purpose describing their interest and how the certificate will advance their career goals, and/or a resume.

 

Successful applicants from outside the University of Cincinnati will demonstrate that they have strong academic and/or professional backgrounds indicating that they have the skills necessary to meet the demands of participation in this program. Students must have at least a baccalaureate degree with a target of a 3.0 grade point average. A student who received her undergraduate degree from a foreign university will be considered. Applicants will submit a statement of purpose describing their interest and how the certificate will advance their career goals, one letter of recommendation, a resume or C.V., and transcripts from any college or university attended. Additional factors that will be considered are the applicant’s work experience and prior graduate education, if any. Lower grade point averages from an undergraduate program may be offset by substantial professional experience or graduate education.

 

Students must demonstrate English proficiency to be able to fully participate in law school classes, which involve in-class dialogue about complex legal issues and substantial reading of sophisticated legal texts. If English is not the applicant’s primary language, the applicant will be required to take and submit an exam that shows English proficiency. Applicants with the following scores will be given preference: 1) TOEFL internet-based 100, computer-based 250 , or paper-based 600; 2) IELTS 7.0; or 3)ELS completion of Level 112. Applicants with internet-based TOEFL scores of 80 and above will also be considered.

 

Applicants will not be required to take a standardized test for admission to the certificate program. Students who are participating in the UC Law J.D. or LL.M. programs are not eligible to participate in this certificate program. Classes taken in this program will not transfer to the J.D. or LL.M. programs.

Certificate in U.S. Law

Applicants must have a law degree from a foreign university—undergraduate or graduate. Successful applicants will demonstrate that they have strong academic and/or professional backgrounds indicating that they have the skills necessary to meet the demands of participation in this program. The target grade point average is a 3.0. Students must demonstrate English proficiency to be able to fully participate in law school classes, which involve in-class dialogue about complex legal issues and substantial reading of sophisticated legal texts.

 

Applicants will submit a statement of purpose describing their interest and how the certificate will advance their career goals, one letter of recommendation, a resume or C.V., and transcripts from any college or university attended. If English is not the applicant’s primary language, the applicant will be required to take and submit an exam that shows English proficiency. Applicants with the following scores will be given preference: 1) TOEFL internet-based 100, computer-based 250 , or paper-based 600; 2) IELTS 7.0; or 3)ELS completion of Level 112. Applicants with internet-based TOEFL scores of 80 and above will also be considered.

Certificate in Fundamentals of U.S. Law

Applicants must have a law degree from a foreign university—undergraduate or graduate. Successful applicants will demonstrate that they have strong academic and/or professional backgrounds indicating that they have the skills necessary to meet the demands of participation in this program. The target grade point average is a 3.0. Students must demonstrate English proficiency to be able to fully participate in law school classes, which involve in-class dialogue about complex legal issues and substantial reading of sophisticated legal texts.

 

Applicants will submit a statement of purpose describing their interest and how the certificate will advance their career goals, one letter of recommendation, a resume or C.V., and transcripts from any college or university attended. If English is not the applicant’s primary language, the applicant will be required to take and submit an exam that shows English proficiency. Applicants with the following scores will be given preference: 1) TOEFL internet-based 100, computer-based 250 , or paper-based 600; 2) IELTS 7.0; or 3)ELS completion of Level 112. Applicants with internet-based TOEFL scores of 80 and above will also be considered.

 

Students who have been accepted in the UC Law LL.M. program and who are in good standing will be automatically eligible to participate in the certificate program.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

All students pursuing a JD or LLM degree at UC Law are classified into one of three tuition rates – Ohio resident, non-resident, or Kentucky Metropolitan Rate.

The chart below shows annual tuition and fee rates for full-time students during the 2016-2017 year. This is the third consecutive year that tuition rates have not increased at the University.

 

2016-2017

Ohio Resident

Non-Resident

Kentucky Metro Rate

Full-time Tuition and Fees

(JD and LLM)

$24,010

$29,010

$24,610

 

 For more details, visit the Office of the Bursar website.

Estimated Living Expenses

In addition to tuition and fees, students must budget for their personal living expenses while at UC law school. Due to the relative low cost of living here, history has shown most students are able to live well far below the estimated 9 month living expense figures shown here:

 

    Room and Board  

$12,102

Books

$1,500

Transportation

$616

Miscellaneous

$5,050

TOTAL

$19,268

 

Students are allowed to receive financial aid (any combination of scholarships, student loans, work-study, etc.) to cover both tuition and fees, as well as any amount up to this total for living expenses.

 

Virtually all UC Law JD and LLM students live off-campus - visit our housing site for more information.

Kentucky Metropolitan Rate

The Kentucky Metropolitan Rate is available to students who reside in any Kentucky county. Eligible residents in these counties qualify for the metropolitan rate which is equal to Ohio resident tuition and fees plus $300 per semester.

Additional Residency/Tuition Rates

Students in several other categories may also qualify for lower tuition rates and/or immediate Ohio residency:

 

  • Married Non-Resident Students
  • Veterans of the U.S. Armed Services
  • Residents of over 20 counties in southern and eastern Indiana
  • Independent, self-sustaining non-residents who have lived in Ohio for 12 months or more

 

Affording an Excellent Legal Education

Earning a Juris Doctor or LLM degree at UC Law is both a dream fulfilled and an investment made in your future success. At UC Law, we understand that for many gaining access to financial aid is a critical step towards this end. So, we assist students through a combination of funding sources including scholarship opportunities, fellowships, work study and loans.

Diversity

We are proud of our tradition of fostering an intellectually challenging and diverse learning environment. UC Law introduced the nation’s first joint JD/MA Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies degree program in 1995 and continues to lead and innovate with initiatives such as our Center for Race, Gender, and Social Justice.

 

The UC College of Law’s diversity statement recognizes diversity as a core value – a value that also is embraced by the University of Cincinnati. As a public research university, UC recognizes a very broad and inclusive concept of diversity that includes commonly recognized considerations such as race, ethnicity, gender, age, disability status, socioeconomic status, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion and regional or national origin. In fact, UC recently earned the prestigious Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) award from “Insight Into Diversity’ magazine, the oldest and largest diversity-focused publication in higher education.  And, the University’s Diversity Council helps to shape and implement new ideas to foster an even more welcoming and supportive environment for all.

 

Cincinnati Law also is committed to the idea that young people from diverse backgrounds can and should be exposed to the legal profession from an early age. We actively participate in diversity initiatives within the legal profession that include Law & Leadership Institute, a program to help increase minority representation in Ohio’s law schools, and Summer Work Experience in Law (SWEL), a program sponsored by the Black Lawyers Association of Cincinnati-Cincinnati Bar Association Round Table, to expose minority high school and college students to careers in the law.

Cincinnati and Region

Cincinnati is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio that serves as county seat of Hamilton County. Settled in 1788, the city is located on the north side of the confluence of the Licking with the Ohio River.

 

Cincinnati is a three-state, 15-county region that offers world-class assets in arts and culture, amusements, hospitality, sports and recreation. Ranked in Forbes.com's list of Best Bargain Cities in America and as one of the Top 10 Safest Cities), Cincinnati features all the amenities of a large bustling metropolis while maintaining a friendly, small town atmosphere – a unique balancing act of extraordinary contrasts – but one that makes the region a remarkable flexible location filled with a wealth of opportunities and options.

 

The area known as "Northern Kentucky" is called the southern side of Cincinnati and is located directly across the river from downtown.

What Makes Cincinnati So Special?

It’s a great place to work.

Cincinnati is the seat of both the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit and the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Ohio, and home to more than 800 law firms. The opportunities in business and industry are equally rich. It’s no wonder that Fortune called Greater Cincinnati one of the top ten places to live and work, that Forbes called the region one of the “Best Places for Business and Careers” or that Time named Cincinnati one of the “Ten Best Cities to Start a Career.” The Huffington Post wrote “Cincinnati is proving that the Midwest as a startup ecosystem is flourishing and funding is available.” And a recent 2016 study by KPMG concluded that Cincinnati is the #1 Big City for Business.

It’s a great place to study.

UC’s Uptown campus is a happening place in its own right. Anchored by the bookstore, cafes, and student recreational facilities on MainStreet, the heart of campus offers the resources of a major research institution and the amenities of a well-appointed small town. In fact, Forbes named UC among the most beautiful college campuses. And that warmth and convenience continue in our off-campus development. The recent development on Calhoun Street has reinvigorated the Clifton neighborhood with new apartments, townhomes, and condominiums and more than 90,000 square feet of new retail space.

It’s a great place to eat.

Whether you want to go eclectic on Main Street or upscale in Mt. Adams, the restaurants are fantastic. And don’t forget Cincinnati traditions like Skyline chili (to pass as a local, ask for a four-way with a cheese coney on the side) or the handmade ice-cream at Graeter’s (three words: black raspberry chip). We love food festivals too, with Taste of Cincinnati, the Great Inland Seafood Festival, and Oktoberfest (second largest in the world, after Munich). And if you like to cook for yourself, you have to visit Findlay Market, one of the oldest public markets in the country.

It’s a great place to play.

We have one of the biggest and best park systems in the nation, including the new Friendship Park along the river—perfect for running or in-line skating—and an incredible system of public golf courses. For families, nothing beats a trip to Kings Island Theme Park and Waterpark, the Newport Aquarium, or the world-class Cincinnati Zoo. Runners will love the Flying Pig Marathon, one of the fastest growing in the country, and sports buffs have baseball with the Reds, football with the Bengals, and hockey with the Cincinnati Cyclones.

It’s a great place to listen.

Cincinnati’s live music scene will rival your iPod in its diversity. Anchored by the MidPoint Music Festival, our thriving rock and pop community has earned us a place on Esquire magazine’s “Top 10 Cities that Rock” list. Macy’s Music Festival brings the best in jazz and R&B to town, and Cincinnati’s symphony and opera company have always been among the best.

About Cincinnati Law

Law School History

 

  • Founded in 1833 - UC Law is the 4th oldest continuously operating law school in the country and the only law school in Ohio until 1885.

 

 

Our School

 

  • 8.4 to 1 Student/Faculty Ratio
  • < 300 Students
  • > 35 Student Organizations
  • 5 Journals
  • 7 Centers and Institutes

 

The Value of a Cincinnati Law Degree

While some law schools may seem very much alike, we like to cite evidence of what we believe culminates in a unique value proposition found at UC Law. This includes factors like tuition rates and student loan indebtedness below national averages, two-thirds of the UC Law school student body receiving renewable scholarship assistance of approximately $2 million, and excellent bar passage rates. In addition, metropolitan Cincinnati is one of the most affordable cities to live in the nation, while also boasting 800+ law firms, numerous Fortune 500 companies, and local, state, and federal courts.

 

The value stretches even farther when considering the educational benefits of our low 8.6 to 1 student-to-faculty ratio, first-year “cohort” sections of fewer than 25 students each, and one-on-one career planning advisement with attorneys in our Center for Professional Development.

 

Accreditation

 

Approved by the American Bar Association

 

Bar Exam

 

  • Overall takers passed the February 2016 Ohio Bar at a 76% rate - 15% above the statewide average. Cincinnati Law's average 2015-16 Ohio Bar Exam passage rate is 85%.

 

ABA Required Disclosures

 

The College of Law provides the following information in accordance with American Bar Association Standard 509:

 

JD Program

Our UC Law JD program prepares students to enter diverse professional settings all over the world. Most UC law school graduates serve in a legal capacity, such as a counselor, litigator, negotiator, drafter, advocate, and decision-maker. Others work in business management, consulting, media, politics, teaching, and areas where having a law degree helps them be better at what they do.

 

Our UC Law JD degree program strives to prepare students to be COMPLETE PROFESSIONALS who know the law and possess the skills necessary to practice law. It also prepares students to be professionals with the leadership and communications skills required to be successful. AT UC Law you will THINK about law, DO lawyering tasks, and learn what it means to BE an ethical and fulfilled professional.

 

THINK Learn the law from our award-winning UC law school faculty in small classes. All UC Law first-year students take a curriculum aimed at introducing foundational legal knowledge. Upper-level JD students have the opportunity to select most of their classes in areas of professional interest to them. UC law school students build the breadth of knowledge necessary to handle complex problems for their clients. They also have the opportunity to deepen their knowledge in areas where their passions and interests lead them.

 

UC law school students can elect to follow professional pathways in the following areas: Business and Entrepreneurship Law; Criminal Law; Innovation, Technology, and Intellectual Property; Science, Health, and Environment; International; Litigation and Alternative Dispute Resolution; Public Interest Law, and General and Small Practice.

 

DO You will have many opportunities to build skills necessary in the practice of law at UC Law. Students simulate lawyering tasks in many UC law school classes, such as learn how to conduct a trial, advocate for a client in a mediation, conduct business transactions from the deal sheet to the closing, draft legal briefs and contracts, or negotiate a deal or a settlement.

 

UC Law JD students also have the opportunity to apply their new lawyering skills on behalf of real clients. Through UC law school externship and clinical programs, students can serve clients under the supervision of licensed attorneys in business, criminal, litigation, and nonprofit settings. UC law students have many experiences that prepare them to hit the ground running when they enter the profession. 

 

BE In addition to gaining the knowledge and skills necessary to be a lawyer, UC law school students develop a professional and ethical sensitivity to practice law with integrity. Successful and fulfilled professionals must also develop their interpersonal skills. Every law student is trained how to interview and counsel clients through our innovative Client Counseling program in their second year of the UC Law JD program.

 

Through our Center for Professional Development at UC Law, they also evaluate their own strengths and interests and develop a personal professional plan to help them find the best area of legal practice to match their interests and passions.

Visit Cincinnati Law

Cincinnati Law is part of a major research university located in a thriving metropolitan area rich with history, culture, sports, and recreation. Named by Forbes as one of the “world’s most beautiful college campuses”, we strongly recommend that you schedule a visit and experience the distinctive qualities of our law school and university for yourself.

 

As you plan your visit, be sure to schedule an extra day in Cincinnati so you can begin to appreciate all that our vibrant city has to offer. Experience a major league baseball or football game at the stadiums on the banks of the Ohio River, listen to a world-class symphony at Music Hall, or enjoy our vast system of parks. While you are here, be sure to sample our unique chili or stop by one of our neighborhood restaurants and bars in Over-the Rhine or Mt. Adams.

 

Getting to Cincinnati is easy. We are a day’s drive or less from many U.S. cities. See our Directions and Parking page for additional information.

 

If you prefer to come by air, we are located less than 30 minutes from the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport (actually located south of the Ohio River in Covington Kentucky; hence CVG) or just an hour from the Dayton International Airport (DAY).

Joint Degree Programs

The University of Cincinnati College of Law recognizes that the practice of law often involves an intersection with other disciplines.  If you have your eye on a career that will be enhanced by a strong background in law plus another academic field, a joint degree program may be right for you.  The following joint degree programs allow students to complete the JD and the Master’s Degree in just 4 years—a feat that usually requires 5 years if pursued in the traditional, consecutive manner. 

 

 

 

 

In the first year of law school, students may also create a custom, individualized program with other graduate degree programs in areas of interest to them.  

LLM in the U S Legal System - French Presentation

UC Law LLM

2016 Travel Calendar

Every year the University of Cincinnati College of Law admissions staff meets with prospective students from around the country. The majority of law school fairs and prospective student receptions nationwide occur in the fall, with a smaller number of events held the rest of the year. In 2016, we will be visiting the following locations. Be sure to mark your calendar and also check back for more events that will be added as they are confirmed.

 

Washington D.C. Forum DC 7/23/16
Central State University Annual Constitution Pre-Law Day OH 9/15/16
DePauw Graduate School Fair IN 9/22/16
Indiana University - Bloomington (MAPLA) IN 10/3/16
Centre College Law School Fair KY 10/4/16
Georgetown College Law School Fair KY 10/4/16
Transylvania University Law School Fair KY 10/5/16
University of Kentucky Law School Fair KY 10/5/16
University of Notre Dame Law School Fair IN 10/6/16
University of Cincinnati Law School Fair OH 10/10/16
University of Dayton Law Fair OH 10/11/16
Miami University Law Fair OH 10/12/16
Ohio University Law Fair OH 10/13/16
Bowling Green State University Law School Fair OH 10/14/16
New York Forum    NY        10/14/16-10/15/16     
University of Michigan Law Day MI 10/19/16
Ohio State University Law Fair OH 10/20/16
University of Colorado Law Fair (WAPLA) CO 10/24/16
Youngstown State Law Day OH 10/24/16
The College of Wooster Law School Fair OH 10/25/16
University of Utah Law Fair (WAPLA) UT 10/25/16
Utah Valley University Fall Dean's Night UT 10/25/16
Brigham Young University Law Fair (WAPLA) UT 10/26/16
Phi Alpha Delta Pre-Law Expo DC 10/28/16
Atlanta Forum GA 10/28/16
Chicago Forum IL 11/15/16

Academic Success Program

Cincinnati Law is committed to providing the resources and assistance to help our students succeed.  From your first year through the bar exam, we are here to support and guide you throughout your law school career.

First Year Students

First year law students at UC Law are invited to participate in Structured Study Groups (SSGs), led by trained second- and third-year law students.  Groups meet twice weekly for one hour. One meeting per week focuses on developing and applying the skills needed to successfully navigate the learning process in law school (case study method, Socratic method, case briefing, outlining, memorization, legal analysis, time management). During the second weekly meeting, students focus on strategies for exam preparation and performance including the completion of practice exam questions. This weekly exercise throughout the first semester helps students understand and prepare for law school exams; the primary basis of grading in the first year of law school.  SSG Leaders  do not tutor or teach the law; rather they guide participating students in developing the skills to teach themselves the law.

 

First year students also may schedule individual meetings or participate in a second semester study group with the Director of Academic Success and Bar Programs.

Upper Level Students

UC Law Second and third year students who are interested in enhancing their academic performance are encouraged to schedule one-on-one meetings or attend subject-specific study groups with the Director of Academic Success and Bar Programs.  During these meetings, students complete various legal reading and writing exercises to help improve their analytical and writing skills, as well as memorization exercises and quizzes to assist in acquisition of law needed for strong exam performance.

 

Students may also schedule exam preparation meetings in the month preceding an exam period. Students will take practice exams, receive individual critiques of their work, focus on improving areas of weakness, and learn strategies to enhance their exam performance.

 

In the month prior to registration, upper level students may meet with the Director of Academic Success for assistance with class selection.

Bar Exam Preparation

In the spring semester, the UC College of Law offers Legal Analysis and Drafting: The Bar Exam for third year students.  This course serves the dual purpose of equipping students to succeed on the written portions of bar examinations and preparing for legal practice by developing and honing skills relevant to legal analysis, professional and effective written communication, principled advocacy, and management of legal work. Students taking the course receive instruction, practice, critical peer review, and coaching in these skills that will be valuable in taking a bar examination in Ohio or any other jurisdiction. Students practice these skills using model and previously-administered essays and Multistate Performance Tests (MPTs).  Students also engage in self-assessment exercises addressing learning styles and time/work management issues. Although students will have an opportunity to review some core legal concepts, the focus of this course is on building a strong foundation in the skills necessary to be successful on a bar exam.

 

This course is not intended to substitute for a commercial bar review course taken after graduation, necessary for reviewing core concepts learned throughout law school and legal concepts not studied in law school or required by the jurisdiction in which students wish to practice.  Students also should familiarize themselves with the bar exam requirements for the state in which they plan to take the exam.

 

In the month prior to registration, upper level students also may meet with the Director of Academic Success for assistance with class selection useful for the bar exam.

Writing Specialist

Are you an expert writer?  Are you confident in your ability to draft strong, correct and compelling prose? If so, stop reading now. If not, you may be interested to hear that UC Law is piloting a Writing Specialist offering.   (Read more)

Graduate Certificate Programs

Students who wish to learn about law or prepare for a bar exam but who do not have time to invest in the J.D. or LL.M. degrees should consider pursuing a graduate certificate program in law. Each of these programs can be completed in one semester. The UC College of Law has certificate programs available for

 

  • non-lawyers who work in fields where legal knowledge would enhance their occupational success and satisfaction;
  • graduate students in other disciplines;
  • lawyers who would like to gain additional knowledge and skills to enhance their legal practices; and
  • foreign-trained lawyers.

 

Students interested in any of the certificate programs described below should contact either: Nora Burke Wagner at 513-556-0801 or nora.wagner@uc.edu Associate Dean Nancy Oliver at 513-556-0065 or nancy.oliver@uc.edu.

Certificate in Legal Studies

This certificate program is available to anyone with an undergraduate degree interested in studying law. This program would be of interest to professionals in fields for which legal knowledge would benefit them, students in other UC graduate programs, and lawyers wishing to obtain new skills and knowledge. Many non-lawyers work in fields where legal knowledge would enhance their occupational success and satisfaction. Human resource professionals deal with employment and labor law on a daily basis. Journalists need to understand their legal rights and the limits of the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Business professionals increasingly benefit from knowledge of laws related to business entities, legal compliance, intellectual property, employment, tax, and other topics. Health care workers benefit from knowledge of health and drug regulation and reimbursement systems. Criminal justice workers benefit from knowledge of criminal law and procedure. Many other professions could be added to this list. Students in other UC graduate programs would benefit by increasing their knowledge in law. This could include students in engineering, pharmacology, architecture, business, design, political science, social work, race, gender, and sexuality studies and many others. Other students may be lawyers who would like to gain new knowledge and skills to enhance their legal practices. A lawyer who would like to add criminal law as a new component of her law practice may be interested in the program. A lawyer who left the practice of law temporarily to raise children may wish to refresh legal skills and knowledge. Students earn at least 12 credit hours (and up to 18 credits), consisting of two core courses (4 credits) and 3 or 4 elective courses (8 or more credits). The required courses are:

 

  • Intro to Law. This 1-credit course provides students with a common grounding in basic legal concepts, historical context, legal institutions, and the language of law and legal reasoning. The course will also familiarize students with how to prepare for and participate in courses at the College of Law.
  • The U.S. Legal System. This 3-credit course helps students gain an understanding of the critical features of the U.S. legal tradition, the functional components and participants in our legal system, and key legal concepts from various fields of law.

 

These required classes may be waived for practicing attorneys for whom these basic courses would not be beneficial. Students will select the rest of their classes from the curriculum related to the field of law of interest to them. The UC College of Law offers classes in the following areas of practice: business and entrepreneurship law; criminal law; general and small practice; intellectual property law; international law; law of health, the environment, and technology; litigation and alternative dispute resolution; and public interest law. Students who are participating in the J.D. or LL.M. programs are not eligible to participate in this certificate program. Classes taken in this program will not transfer to the UC Law's J.D. or LL.M. programs. Additional information on the requirements and application process can be found under Certificate Admissions.

Certificate in U.S. Law

This certificate is designed for foreign-trained attorneys who wish to study the U.S. legal system to better represent U.S. clients and to become more prepared to negotiate and litigate with U.S. parties. This certificate would be attractive to students who are not able to devote sufficient time and/or resources to pursue a two-semester LL.M. degree but who would benefit from studying U.S. law and living in the U.S. Students will earn at least 12 credit hours (and up to 18 credits), consisting of two core courses (4 credits) and 3 or 4 elective courses (8 or more credits). The required courses are:

 

  • Intro to Law. This 1-credit course provides students with a common grounding in basic legal concepts, historical context, legal institutions, and the language of law and legal reasoning. The course will also familiarize students with how to prepare for and participate in courses at the College of Law.
  • The U.S. Legal System. This 3-credit course helps students gain an understanding of the critical features of the U.S. legal tradition, the functional components and participants in our legal system, and key legal concepts from various fields of law.

 

Students will select the rest of their classes from the curriculum related to the field of law of interest to them. The UC College of Law offers classes in the following areas of practice: business and entrepreneurship law; criminal law; general and small practice; intellectual property law; international law; law of health, the environment, and technology; litigation and alternative dispute resolution; and public interest law. Applicants must have a law degree from a foreign university—undergraduate or graduate. Successful applicants will demonstrate that they have strong academic and/or professional backgrounds indicating that they have the skills necessary to meet the demands of participation in this program. The target grade point average is a 3.0. Students must demonstrate English proficiency to be able to fully participate in law school classes, which involve in-class dialogue about complex legal issues and substantial reading of sophisticated legal texts. Additional information on the requirements and application process can be found under Certificate Admissions.

Certificate in Fundamentals of U.S. Law

This certificate program is available to foreign-trained attorneys who would like to study the fundamentals of U.S. Law in order to prepare to take a bar examination in a U.S. jurisdiction. A foreign-trained lawyer could pursue this certificate alone or could pursue it while engaged in UC Law's LL.M. program. Participating students will build fundamental skills and knowledge that will make it more likely for them to pass a bar examination and better serve their future legal clients. Students will earn at least 12 credit hours, but may earn more credits based on their particular needs. The certificate will require students to take six credits from the UC College of Law curriculum that represents fundamental courses that are frequently tested on the bar exam and include: contracts; torts; civil procedure; legal research and writing; constitutional law; criminal law; property; criminal procedure; legal ethics ; corporations; evidence; federal courts; payment systems; real estate transactions; secured transactions; wills and estates, trusts and future interests; federal income tax; agency, partnership, and unincorporated businesses; sales; administrative law; family law; and future courses that may be added of this type. For their remaining credits, students may select other fundamental courses of interest to them or other courses based on the type of legal practice they wish to pursue. The curriculum of the College includes courses in the following areas of practice: business and entrepreneurship law; criminal law; general and small practice; intellectual property law; international law; law of health, the environment, and technology; litigation and alternative dispute resolution; and public interest law. Applicants must have a law degree from a foreign university—undergraduate or graduate. Successful applicants will demonstrate that they have strong academic and/or professional backgrounds indicating that they have the skills necessary to meet the demands of participation in this program. The target grade point average is a 3.0. Students must demonstrate English proficiency to be able to fully participate in law school classes, which involve in-class dialogue about complex legal issues and substantial reading of sophisticated legal texts. Students who have been accepted in the LL.M. program and who are in good standing will be automatically eligible to participate in the certificate program. Additional information on the requirements and application process can be found under Certificate Admissions.